You just found out that you have been selected for a tour of duty - and your dependents cannot accompany you. The good news is that you are entitled to a special military incentive pay known as Family Separation Allowance.
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8 Simple Steps: Computing Military Separation Pay

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You just found out that you have been selected for a tour of duty - and your dependents cannot accompany you. The good news is that you are entitled to a special military incentive pay known as Family Separation Allowance.

Hardship tours and deployments usually qualify for family separation allowance, as well as attendance at some schools. Family separation allowance is $250 a month, and it is also prorated for partial months.

It can be complicated to figure out your Military Separation Pay, but we'd like to make it easy. Follow the 8 simple steps in the example below and you'll find your military separation pay entitlement instantly:

  1. Start with the day you are leaving. Family separation allowance starts on the first day that you leave your duty station.

  2. Find out your return date. Family separation allowance stops the day before you arrive at your original duty station.

  3. Add only the full months that you are going to be gone. For example, if you leave mid September and expect to be home mid March add together only the months October through February.

  4. Multiply the full months by $250. So, if you are gone mid January to mid December you would multiply February through November (10 months) by $250 for a total of $2,500.

  5. Now compute your partial-months pay allowance. For example if you leave January 15 and return December 4 you would add 16 days for January and 26 days for December, for a total of 42 days.

  6. Divide $250 by 30 to get $8.33; round that up to $8 per day separation pay.

  7. Multiply $8 by the total of partial month days. Using the example above, you would multiply $8 by 42 (days), which equals $336.

  8. Add your partial months to your full months to calculate your separation pay. Using the example above, $2,500 (full months) + 336 (partial months) = $2,836.



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