Under the New GI Bill, members receive 36 months of education benefits. Military children may start using transferred GI Bill education benefits only after the military servicemember has completed at least 10 years of service in the Armed Forces.
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Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Benefits Now Transfer to Spouses and Children

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The new Post-9/11 GI Bill makes it possible for military servicemembers to transfer part or even all of their GI Bill education benefits to a spouse or to their children. The Department of Defense finalized the eligibility criteria for transferring GI Bill education benefits, in the Post 9/11 GI Bill benefit transfer program.

ARE YOU ELIGIBLE FOR THE POST 9/11 GI BILL BENEFIT TRANSFER PROGRAM?

Any military member on active duty or in the Selected Reserve on or after August 1, 2009 is eligible to transfer his or her education benefits, as long as he or she qualifies for the Post-9/11 GI Bill and meets certain military service requirements.

The basic service requirement is at least six years of military service, and the agreement to serve an additional four years, at the time of enrollment in the Post 9/11 GI Bill education benefits transfer program.

WHO IS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR THE POST 9/11 GI BILL BENEFIT TRANSFER PROGRAM?

If you retired or separated from military service prior to August 1, 2009, you are not eligible to transfer education benefits, even if you are eligible for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits (more than 90 days of active duty after September 11, 2001, still in the service or awarded an honorable discharge).

Military servicemembers transferred to the Fleet Reserve, or Individual Ready Reserve (IRR), before August 1, 2009 are also ineligible to transfer their education benefits.

Exceptions to the required four years of additional military service requirement include: if the servicemember is not able to re-enlist due to a DoD or service policy. Servicemembers must, however, serve the maximum time allowed before separating from military service.

This means that if an enlisted member cannot re-enlist or extend enlistment for four years, or an officer cannot extend the commitment for four years, each can still participate in the Post 9/11 GI Bill education transfer provision, if each has served in the military for the maximum period allowed.

TRANSFERRING YOUR GI BILL EDUCATION BENEFITS AFTER MILITARY RETIREMENT

Military servicemembers who are eligible to retire between Aug. 1, 2009 and Aug. 1, 2013, can transfer educational benefits with no additional service requirement.

Military servicemembers with an approved retirement date after Aug. 1, 2009 and before July 1, 2010 qualify for transfers with no additional service. Military servicemembers eligible for retirement after Aug. 1, 2009 but before Aug. 1, 2010, qualify with one additional year of service, after approval to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits.

Military personnel eligible for retirement between Aug. 1, 2010 and July 31, 2011, can qualify with two additional years of service after approval to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits. Military personnel eligible to retire between Aug. 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012, would qualify with three additional years of service after transfer of benefits approval.

TRANSFERRED BENEFITS FOR MILITARY SPOUSES

Military spouses may begin using transferred GI Bill education benefit immediately, and for as long as the military servicemember remains in the Armed Forces. After separation from active duty, military spouses can use transferred education benefits for up to 15 years.

A military spouse is not eligible, however, for the monthly stipend or books and supplies stipend while the military member is on active duty.

TRANSFERRED BENEFITS FOR YOUR MILITARY CHILDREN

Military children may start using transferred GI Bill education benefits only after the military servicemember has completed at least 10 years of service in the Armed Forces. Military children can also use transferred education benefits while the servicemember remains in the Armed Forces or after separation from active duty.

Children may not use the transferred education benefit until attaining a secondary school diploma (or GED), or reaching age 18. Unlike military spouses, military children are entitled to the monthly stipend and books and supplies stipend even while the eligible servicemember is on active duty, and children using transferred benefits are not subject to the 15-year date limit; they simply cannot use the benefit after age 26.

A child's subsequent marriage will not affect his or her eligibility to receive the educational benefit; however, even after an individual has designated a child as a transferee, the individual still retains the right to revoke or modify the transfer at any time.

TRANSFER OR USE YOUR GI BILL BENEFITS NOW

Under the new GI Bill, members receive 36 months of education benefits. The family member receiving transferred education benefits must be enrolled in the Defense Eligibility Enrollment Reporting System (DEERS) at the time of transfer. And, even after transferring education benefits, the benefits themselves remain the property of the military servicemember who earned them. A servicemember's GI Bill benefits cannot be treated as "joint property" in a divorce.



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